The HaloEd Project

A web site dedicated to microbiology education

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Introduction

Radiation Resistance

 

-       Ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight can damage DNA by causing Thymine-Thymine dimers to be formed, resulting in mutations.

-       Recent studies have shown that Halobacteria are able to withstand high dosages of UV (see McReady et al.)

-       Halobacteria have adapted to the harsh environment they live in by having a very active DNA repair systems, especially one called Photoreactivation.

-       They possess Photolyase, an enzyme, which reverses Thymine-Thymine dimers using visible light, repairing the DNA damage.

-       They also contain large quantities of red Carotenoids, which have been shown to be photoprotective.

-       In an experiment, a type of a Halobacteria was taken out into space and survived the trip.

 

 

Teacher's nook

Ecology

Role in food chain

Motility

Radiation resistance

Cellular energetics

Genetics

Genome sequence

Bioinformatics

Biotechnology

Patents

Lesson plans

Co-teaching hints

Molgent

FAQ

Further reading

Contacts

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